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Yoke

[Home] [Concept] [Attic] [Setup] [MIP] [Centre Console] [Throttle Quadrant] [Seats] [Overhead] [Cockpit] [Dimensions] [Flying] [FMC/CDU] [Pedals] [Front & Side Views] [Tiller] [Yoke] [Links]

I had fitted CH Yokes on fixed pedestals to fly the Sim, so after a while I had a think about building my own set of Yokes.

There were a lot of units for sale on the web, some very realistic, but as usual very expensive too.

Actually non of them would do what mine can now do, namely both work in unison and all the buttons work as well !!


I started by building a mock-up out of plain wooden planks (real size) and made angled brackets for the bottom corners and pivots where the yoke handles would fit.


Here are some close-up’s of the brackets....


Crude, I grant you but just seeing if what I am thinking  will work or not?


Next is the painful bit, I had already purchased 2 x CH yoke units (£150:00 each), and decided to hack the units apart to get to the Yoke handles, wiring and most importantly, Potentiometers and levers used in the inside.

My theory was that if I could use the existing  hardware from inside the units I wouldn’t have to do any programming and also be able to use the CH interface for Calibration easily.


Once I had removed the lid from the first Yoke unit, it was easy to understand why they were so expensive, the workmanship and robustness of the innards was something to see.

So with trepidation I started to hacksaw various bits off the casing in order to use it how I wanted, Ouch! I hear you say, but when you see what I wanted to do with it, maybe you will understand....?


On the right is a close-up picture of the piece I cut out of the Yoke unit, which houses the Pot, levers and most importantly the trim thumb wheel too, this will prove to be most important when setting up the whole thing.

You can see on the right of the picture I have connected the Pot to the base of the (new Yoke) cross bar, as it swings back and forth it operates the Pot giving forward and backward up/down movement to the elevator.

The picture on the left shows what I did with the left/right Pot, I have mounted that on the upper surface of the cross bar and as you can see have mounted the pivot onto the “push rods” that connect with the Yoke handles.


Now I have both Elevator and Aileron control, as was before in the original CH unit.


Just to give you a clue, the cross bar elbow’s and upright’s  are all made from bog standard B&Q square drainpipe..!!


Some more photo’s of the workings.

No I need to fit the whole thing together and connect up the wiring, pivot the cross bar and get it to stand up straight, on its own?

So here are the Yokes fitted ( I have connected all the push buttons in parallel so that they all do the same things, when pressed), and fitted angle brackets to enable it to move forwards and back.

Now its all fitting into place, I need to integrate it all into the rest of the centre console.

This could be tricky as I already have the control units and wiring in there for the TQ and Auto throttles too, getting crowded....!


So I cut a small section out of the base of my TQ stand and mount the working at its base, you can also see the springs I have fitted to ensure that the whole unit stands up-right and returns to a central position when let go.

The brackets fitted to the side of the cross bar are to strengthen it longitudinal wise, the spring tension tended to pull it onto the floor

So now all fitted back into position and painted up the Yokes, now looks almost like the real thing just need the check-list’s fitting and its hard to tell the difference...?







Nice, all lit up and flying too........!